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Sunday, November 27

  1. page SIMSvSIMS_Projects edited ... Mike Marbles2 Mike This is the answer to Connected Math Curriculum p.8 question A. I placed a…
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    Mike Marbles2
    Mike This is the answer to Connected Math Curriculum p.8 question A. I placed all 7 marbles in one bin because the kid is pulling blindfolded.
    {SIMS-2016_ClueGame.tp}
    Clue Game
    Clueless by Traci and Susan First we drew a floor plan that had rooms of various sizes. The rooms' areas were multiples of 4 just for sake of easy number manipulation. The living room was 12 square units, the bedroom and kitchen were both 8 square units, and the den and bathroom were both 4 square units. The question was: What is the probability of the murder weapon, a rope, being found in a specific room? (You choose the room.) The second question was: If you were only allowed one guess, which room would you guess the rope was hidden in? To derive empirical data, we made a mixer using 36 balls since the total square units of the floor plan's rooms was 36. One question we as teachers had was will students make all 36 balls or will they look for a way to use proportions to use less balls? To derive theoretical data, we made a mixer using 9 balls. 12/4 = 3 8/4=2 8/4=2 4/4=1 4/4=1 3+2+2+1+1=9 Suggested extensions for this problem included a discussion of proportions, a discussion of area, and would the probability change if the rooms' sizes change proportionally or disproportionally?

    {SIMS-2016_ClueGame.tp}
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  2. page SIMSvSIMS_Projects edited ... {SIMS-2016_CarnivalSchool.tp} Choosing Paths ... p. 24 Looking Looking at this ...…
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    {SIMS-2016_CarnivalSchool.tp}
    Choosing Paths
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    p. 24
    Looking

    Looking
    at this
    ...
    to B.
    Originally

    Originally
    looking at
    ...
    Cave B.
    I believe the data is not equal because the Middle Path only has 1 result- Cave A. While 'M' had an equal (33 1/3%) chance of being selected, it always resulted in ending in Cave A. This gave a person going through the paths a greater chance of ending in A over B.
    {SIMS-2016_ChoosingPaths_Trevino.tp}
    Mike Marbles2
    Mike This is the answer to Connected Math Curriculum p.8 question A. I placed all 7 marbles in one bin because the kid is pulling blindfolded.
    {SIMS-2016_ClueGame.tp}

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  4. page SIMSvSIMS_Projects edited ... Red Blue Game If a carnival game is played in which there is one of each red, blue, green, an…
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    Red Blue Game
    If a carnival game is played in which there is one of each red, blue, green, and yellow marbles in the first bucket and one red, yellow, and green marble in the second bucket, the player must draw a blue and a red marble to win. This sampler shows a mixer for each bucket. The player must draw blue from the first bucket and red from the second. The "Join" column on the table of runs shows the results. In the formula column, if the join column shows the B, R win, then the player will earn $2. If this column is anything else, the player loses the $1 s/he payed to play the game. Then, the sum column, shows the final sum of the Join column, after all players have played the game, providing a total of how much the players collectively lost (or won). We can see that they lost a total of $88.
    {SIMS-2016_BlueRedGame.tp}
    Marble Pull Game
    This is a marble pull game. A player removes one marble from a cup (red, blue, yellow, green), then pulls a second marble from a second cup (red, yellow, green). The players pays $1 to play and wins $3 if they pull out one red and one blue marble, any color. This particular model shows a two-step mixer in which only blue marble pulls from the first cup are counted. These values are converted into numerical values to establish how much money the house or the player gains/loses across multiple runs. This format resulted in a column of data with many blank spaces (pulls which no data was collected on the second pull because it wasn't blue). To solve this problem, the formula MISSING was used to establish a value for a blank cell. - Kyle Issleb
    {SIMS-2016_MarblePullGame_Issleb.tp}
    Spinner Game
    To win, a player must land on green. They are presented with 2 spinners: $5 with a 1/4 chance to land on green and $3 for a 1/6 chance to land on green. The player must decide which spinner provides better value for their money. Runs for each spinner will be different. If a player had $15, they could play the 1/4 spinner 3 times and the 1/6 spinner 5 times. Have students run the spinners at 3 and 5 respectively. Their results will vary. Have students multiply runs by 10 (30 and 50 times, respectively). Then by 10 again (300 and 500) and 10 again (3000 and 5000). As more runs are used, the % of experimental data will approach theoretical (25% for 1/4, 16,6% for 1/6). However, the counts for each type will routinely show the 1/6 spinner lands on green more often for the money. - Kyle Issleb
    {SIMS-2016_SpinnerGame_Issleb.tp}
    LawnMowing_Rachel 3.3B
    The kids cut lawns to earn money. They thought that customers should pay $20 per lawn. Customers offered different ways to pay and asked the kids to choose. Calculate the expected value of the method and determine if they should accept or reject the pay plan. The customer rolls a pair of number cubes and adds the two numbers. If the sum is even, Julie and Brandon get $25. If it is odd they get $18. We set up a mixer to determine experimental probability for this problem. We used formulas to calculate the total they made in a certain number of runs (lawns mowed/week). We also set up the counter to explore the theoretical probability. *This problem was taken from the Connected Math curriculum, Grade 7.
    One{SIMS-2016_LawnMowing_Rachel 3.3B.tp}
    One
    and One NathanMillerMiller
    Nathan Miller This problem asks, "What is the probablility of a basketball player scoring 0 points, 1 point, or 2 points in a one-and-one free throw situation?" To solve this, I created a 2 spinner tree system in which the first spinner represents the first shot and the following spinners represent the second shot, should a second shot be awarded. You'll notice the first spinner is labeled with "0" & "1" to represent the possible score received for the first shot. The upper right spinner represents the total number of points received after the second shot. This allowed me to skip the step of creating a counter function in my data. This problem came from the Connected Mathematics 2 curriculum published by Pearson.
    {SIMS-2016_One and One_Miller.tp}
    Wheel MattLeblanc
    Original Question: What is the probability of of a specific value appearing on a spinner? To answer I made a spinner of 10 equal slices, each with a unique value. Then I graphed the outcomes of a 1000 trials.
    ...
    Third Question: What would be the maximum run and value in 100 trials. I created a formula and graphed the results.
    Created by: Matthew LeBlanc Adapted from: Adapted Mathematics
    {SIMS-2016_Wheel_MattLeblanc.tp}
    Casino Ewing
    I created a casino game. You pay $7 to play and are payed based on the sum of the two dice you throw. It cost $7 to play Payouts for sums: 2-21 3-14 4-7 5-5 6-4 7-0 8-4 9-5 10-7 11-14 12-21 I used the switch function to show the profit of loss per play. At current payout the game is highly biased for the casino.
    {SIMS-2016_Casino_Ewing.tp}
    Carnival School
    Carnival Game: Student must pick a color marble from each bucket. If he/she has a blue and a red marble he/she will win. The cost of the game is $1. If the player wins they will win $3. The counter shows the theoretical prbablity. Sum_House is the total amount of money that the house has when the player pays. Pay_out shows the amount the house will lose when teh player wins. The total shows what the house gets for each game situation. The sum shows what the house will leave with at the end of the night.
    {SIMS-2016_CarnivalSchool.tp}
    Choosing Paths
    Julie Trevino- Choosing Paths from CM2 p. 24
    Looking at this experiment it looks like there is an equal chance to get into both Cave A and B. There are 3 paths- Upper, Middle, Lower. Upper offers 1 path to Cave A and 1 to B. Middle always goes to Cave A. Lower offers 3 paths- 1 to A and 2 to B.
    Originally looking at it, I thought since there were 3 paths going to Cave A and 3 to Cave B, there was an equal chance for someone entering the path to end in A or B. First, I did this experiment manually with a dice. It resulted in 57% of the time I ended in Cave A and 43% of the time I ended in Cave B. I completed the experiment 174 times. Cave A was consistently above Cave B.
    I believe the data is not equal because the Middle Path only has 1 result- Cave A. While 'M' had an equal (33 1/3%) chance of being selected, it always resulted in ending in Cave A. This gave a person going through the paths a greater chance of ending in A over B.
    {SIMS-2016_ChoosingPaths_Trevino.tp}

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