Nominal Data Examples, Plots and Analysis


Let’s start with the easiest one to understand. Nominal scales are used for labeling variables, without any quantitative value. “Nominal” scales could simply be called “labels.” Here are some examples, below. Notice that all of these scales are mutually exclusive (no overlap) and none of them have any numerical significance. A good way to remember all of this is that “nominal” sounds a lot like “name” and nominal scales are kind of like “names” or labels.
Examples of Nominal Scales
Examples of Nominal Scales
Source:
http://www.mymarketresearchmethods.com/types-of-data-nominal-ordinal-interval-ratio/

Example: Titanic - TinkerPlots Data Set

Context - Always know the context/origin of your data set! This data set contains four numeric attributes.
Fate of the 2201 passengers on the Titanic's maiden voyage. The ship, en route to New York City from Southampton, England, sank on April 14–15, 1912 after colliding with an iceburg about 400 miles south of Newfoundland.
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Attribute Description
Gender: Gender of person
Class: The class the person was traveling in (1-3) or crew member (crew)
Age: Adult or child
Survived: Whether the person survived or not
-----------------------------
Downloaded September, 2004, from:
www.amstat.org/publications/jse/jse_data_archive.htm
and submitted to them by Robert Dawson, Department of Mathematics and Computing Science, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3, CANADA
Original source: "Report on the Loss of the `Titanic' (S.S.)" (1990), British Board of Trade Inquiry Report (reprint), Gloucester, UK: Allan Sutton Publishing.

Case Cards
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Class Bar Graph

Shown in decreasing order from left to right with icons set to “Fuse Rectangular.”
Drag the name right or left to reorder. The Key is shown.
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Analysis
TBA

Gender Bar Graph

Shown in decreasing order from left to right with icons set to “Fuse Rectangular.”
Drag the name right or left to reorder. The Key is shown.
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Analysis
TBA

Bar Graph for Survived with Gender attribute as an overlay

Graph Survived - Drag Gender to the middle of the plot - Select Order
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Analysis
TBA

Create an appropriate plot and answer the following questions.

1. Overall, what percentage of the passengers and crew survived?
The stacked bar graph shows ...
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2. In loading people into life boats, the rule was supposedly "women and children first." How well does it appear that this rule was followed?

Instead of using a stacked bar graph you may create a two-way table. Note that this is NOT a dot plot. Show Cell Percent was used so the values sum to 100%.

The two way table shows ...
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3. How did the class that people were traveling in affect their chance of surviving?

The stacked bar graph shows ...
external image EbaxcLiIUPcVYybVvXObrHYKiXYovD1abA0siRZ2o9Z1qeZn5e-H4TqYp2zJkU6ya05zGpYOIBTWaimOkiFu2_dS7BppF7_EQH-_l6Qi5NQk3Y574i6x1lgdRx5nh3F7AeoG8d3g